• Donnington Grove

Fine Food Organic-September

How your food is grown or raised can have a major impact on your mental and emotional health as well as the environment.
Organic food is often more expensive than conventionally-grown food. But if you set some priorities, it may be possible to purchase organic food and stay within your food budget.
There are many delicious recipes using organic seasonal ingredients online.

Pear
Pears can be thick or thin-skinned with juicy sweet flesh that can be buttery or slightly granular in texture, depending on the variety. The main British-grown varieties are Doyenne du Comice, Conference and Concorde. Comice has a meltingly soft texture, while Conference is slightly more granular. Concorde, a cross of the two pears, is buttery-textured.
TRY pear, hazelnut and chocolate pavlova

Artichoke
The artichoke is mentioned as a garden plant in the 8th century BC. The edible portion of the plant consists of the flower buds before the flowers come into bloom. A cooked, unseasoned artichoke has a delicate flavour.

 

 

Chicory
Chicory can be eaten raw or cooked and comes in red and white varieties. The roots are propogated in warm, moist peat or sand, while the white, fleshy leaves are left to develop in darkness.
TRY mackerel with rhubarb chutney and orange and chicory salad.

Chicory blooms
from July to October. Each flower lasts only one day. Flowers can be seen only during the sunny days.

 

Cobnuts
Cobnuts, which grow in Britain, are a type of hazelnut. You may be able to buy fresh nuts, particularly native cobnuts, still in their husks when they are in season, but most are sold dried and processed.  TRY fruit and cobnut crumble cream.

Sea Bass
A superb sweet, white and textured fish. Sea Bass is a popular feature of menus. It is caught in the North Atlantic, from Norway to Senegal. It closely resembles sea bream in flavour.
TRY roasted sea bass with chorizo, red onion and cherry tomatoes.

Oyster
A saltwater bivalve with a sea-salty flavour and a succulent texture. In the 19th century, oysters were plentiful and cheap and were used to bulk out dishes such as pies, soups and stews. Supplies decreased into the 20th century and now this shellfish is highly prized.  TRY poached oysters with guacamole and sprout salad.

Every day, one oyster filters 50 gallons of water.