• Donnington Grove

What to eat to boost immunity

Do people who eat healthier actually get sick less?

Those who eat more fruits and vegetables appear to have a lower risk of getting an upper respiratory tract infection like the common cold, whether they’re otherwise vegetarian or not. According to a 1968 study in the New York State Dental Journal, even just one added apple a day may help keep the doctor away.

In another study, elderly people were randomised into groups that ate either five servings of fruit and veggies a day or two servings a day. The five-a-day group showed an 80 percent improved antibody response to their pneumonia vaccination compared to the two-a-day group. Even though only 12 out of 40 people in the five-a-day group reached their target levels of servings, they still did six times better than the two-a-day group.

In 1999 the British Journal of Nutrition published a study that was conducted to determine the effect of brightly coloured vegetables on the immune system. For the first two weeks, the subjects ate basically no fruits and veggies. Then, they drank one and a half cups of tomato juice every day for two weeks, followed by two weeks of carrot juice, and then two weeks of spinach powder.

Within two weeks of a fruit- and veggie-deficient diet, immune function plummeted. However, just one and a half cups of tomato juice a day brought subjects back from the ashes. It didn’t take five servings a day—just one tall glass of tomato juice produced results.

The carrot juice alone didn’t seem to help as well, however, nor did the powdered equivalent of a serving of spinach. This tells me two things: how remarkably we can affect our immune function with simple dietary decisions and that not all veggies are alike.

There is one family of vegetables that we definitely don’t want to miss out on. Inflammation and leaky gut can occur all because of an absence in our diet of cruciferous vegetables, including cabbage, collards, cauliflower, kale, Brussels sprouts, and broccoli. To stay healthy this season, eat your veggies.

Local Buzz is delighted to welcome Dr. Michael Greger, a physician, author and professional speaker on public health issues to share his blogs in every issue.
He focuses on the best available balance of evidence from the peer-reviewed
scientific literature.

Both his latest books, How Not to Die and the How Not to Die Cookbook, became instant New York Times Best Sellers. 100% of all proceeds he has ever received from his books, DVDs and speaking engagements have always and will always be donated to charity.

Local Buzz is delighted to welcome Dr. Michael Greger, a physician, author and professional speaker on public health issues to share his blogs in every issue.
He focuses on the best available balance of evidence from the peer-reviewed
scientific literature.

Both his latest books, How Not to Die and the How Not to Die Cookbook, became instant New York Times Best Sellers. 100% of all proceeds he has ever received from his books, DVDs and speaking engagements have always and will always be donated to charity.